Palestinian children are not spared from the illegal dumping of pesticides

 

Last month a joint APN-PANAP report revealed some gruesome facts of Palestinian children suffering a myriad of health impacts. A young school child has become a victim of blood cancer. Many are asthmatic or have respiratory problems. Generally, these are the common observations among children in towns near the Israeli-operated Geshuri agrochemical manufacturing plant.

Children are especially vulnerable to toxic pesticides because they breathe more air, eat more food and drink more water per unit of body weight which leads to greater exposure in a toxin-contaminated environment.

Fatima Al-Zahra’ School’s situation is not different from that of the other schools within 500 metres of the industrial complex. Daily school routines are hindered since the chemical fumes have intensified since February 2016. The noxious gases have made it impossible for the students to carry out physical education classes or morning exercises and oftentimes, students are quarantined during school hours.

The continued operation of the agrochemical plants is in violation of humans’ right to health, safe environment and life. It tramples children’s rights.

Articles 6 and 24 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child state that “every child has the inherent right to life,” that the survival and development of the child must be ensured to the “maximum extent possible,” and that “the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health” must be safeguarded and upheld.

The UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Hilal Elver, and the Special Rapporteur on hazardous substances and wastes, Baskut Tuncak, have stated in their report, “While scientific research confirms the adverse effects of pesticides, proving a definitive link between exposure and human diseases or conditions, or harm to the ecosystem presents a considerable challenge.

“This challenge has been exacerbated by a systematic denial, fuelled by the pesticide and agroindustry, of the magnitude of the damage inflicted by these chemicals, and aggressive, unethical marketing tactics remain unchallenged.”

The rapporteurs have also called for buffer zones to be put in place to safeguard children from the effects of pesticide exposure while waiting for pesticides to be phased out.

We strongly call for the dismantling the Geshuri pesticide factory, and the other factories in the industrial settlements, under the guidance of a team of international and Palestinian experts, in order to prevent further health and environmental damage, and to remediate the land and return it to Palestinians

#StopPoisoningPalestine #PesticidesFreeWorld

TAKE ACTION >> Join us in taking a stand for children’s health

SHOW YOUR SOLIDARITY >> Stop Poisoning Palestine

DOWNLOAD & READ >> Human Rights and Toxic Chemicals in the Occupied West Bank (Palestine)

Israel’s Toxic Pesticides Poison Palestine, Reports Find

Press Release

Israel’s Illegal Production, Trade and Dumping of Toxic Pesticides Violate Human Rights, Threaten Food Sovereignty in Occupied West Bank

Confiscated banned pesticides illegally traded into Occupied Palestinian Territories from Israel. Dukatalon (paraquat and diquat) from Syngenta (L) and Israeli-manufactured endosulfan Thionex (R). Photo credit: Tanya Lee

February 20 (Amman, Jordan) ¬– The illegal trade and the manufacture and use of toxic pesticides in Israeli illegal settlements, result in serious human rights violations and contribute to the food insecurity in the Occupied West Bank. This was the conclusion of a joint fact-finding mission led by the Arab Group for the Protection of Nature (APN) and the PAN Asia Pacific (PANAP).

The investigation reveals the presence of highly hazardous pesticides banned by the Palestinian Authority (PA), such as endosulfan and Dukatalon (paraquat), but illegally traded into the Occupied Palestinian Territories. The reports found that 50% of pesticides in Palestine are illegal, and that five tonnes of banned pesticides have been confiscated since 1995.
Palestine is in no position to dispose of these safely, and Israel refuses to take them back. “It is unacceptable that the PA, with one of the tightest pesticide registration and compliance systems, including not allowing pesticides that are banned in their country of origin, is thwarted at every turn by the Israeli authorities who knowingly facilitate the entry of banned highly hazardous pesticides into the Occupied West Bank,” says Dr. Meriel Watts of PANAP, who participated in the mission.

Pesticide run-off from agricultural operations and hazardous wastes from the manufacture of agrochemicals inside the illegal settlements poison Palestinian farms, livestock, and water sources. Dumping hazardous wastes in Palestinian territory has been documented, including in areas with a high concentration of schools. Communities near Israel’s industrial settlements in the West Bank have reported contamination of their soil and drinking water, proliferation of disease-carrying mosquitoes, and increased incidence of respiratory and eye diseases, including among children. “Some of these agrochemical companies have been shut down inside the Green Line for violations of environmental and health regulations, but operate with impunity inside illegal settlements at the expense of the health, livelihood and environment of Palestinians,” said Razan Zuayter, founder and Board Member of APN. Moreover, the PA does not have access to information on the chemicals manufactured and used inside the illegal settlements.

These activities have been found to violate Palestinians’ rights to information, self-determination, water, highest attainable standard of health and healthy environment, and livelihood. The Israeli State and agrochemical corporations have been identified as accountable for their failure to prevent the illegal trade, and for not providing access to just and fair redress and effective remedy, the reports argue. Razan adds, “these human rights violations are perpetrated in the context of the Israeli occupation and expansion of the illegal settlements”. She cites Israeli control prevents PA from fully enforcing policies to restrict the trade, manufacture and use of around 200 registered active ingredients in Occupied West Bank, as well as to respond to the crisis.

The two reports will be launched along with an international online petition outlining recommendations for the international community. “What more perfect timing to launch the reports but on World Social Justice Day, with the urgent need to bridge the accountability gap and hold the Israeli State and agrochemical companies legally liable for their injustice to the Palestinian people,” concludes Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director of PANAP.

#StopPoisoningPalestine #WorldSocialJusticeDay #PesticidesFreeWorld

To download the reports: Pesticides and Agroecology in the Occupied West Bank
Human Rights and Toxic Chemicals in the Occupied West Bank (Palestine)
To access the online petition: Stop Poisoning Palestine

###

For more information, please contact:

Ms Razan Zuayter, Board Member, Arab Group for the Protection of Nature (APN), Amman, Jordan
Tel: +962 (6) 567 3331; info@apnature.org, cc mariamjaajaa@gmail.com, advocacy@apnature.org

Ms Sarojeni V. Rengam, Executive Director, PAN Asia Pacific (PANAP), Penang Malaysia. Tel: +604 657 0271/ +604 656 0381; sarojeni.rengam@panap.net, cc ava.danlog@panap.net

Dr Meriel Watts, PAN Asia Pacific, merielwatts@xtra.co.nz, + 61-21-1807830