The gains and losses of the Triple COPs entail more work for civil societies and developing countries

PAN delegates (third from left, Jayakumar, Keith Tyrel, Susan Haffmans, Sarojeni Rengam & seventh from left, Dr.Meriel Watts) seen applauding during the adoption of the 50th chemical listed under the Rotterdam Convention.

PAN welcomes the positive outcomes and discussions during the Triple Conferences of the Parties (COPs) to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm (BRS) conventions which took place in Geneva, Switzerland from April 24 to May 5, 2017.

PAN is pleased that two pesticides, carbofuran and trichlorfon, were listed in the Annex III of the Rotterdam Convention. The listing comes as a huge step forward in addressing the numerous cases of poisoning of people and wildlife brought about by these pesticides.

Pesticides listed in Annex 3 of the Rotterdam Convention will be subject to a procedure (Prior Informed Consent Procedure) whereby an informed decision of a country would be needed before a country gives consent or not for future importation of the pesticide. Listing does not constitute a ban. It opens avenues for developing countries to build their capacity to evaluate pesticides and adopt agroecological strategies in managing pests.

PAN Asia Pacific (PANAP) Executive Director, Sarojeni Rengam also welcomed the serious discussion of gender issues in the Triple COPs.

“As the impact of chemicals on the health of women and children is too often ignored, involving women in decision making and in programmes to reduce highly hazardous pesticides and to replace them with agroecology is essential.

“We need policies to support women’s leadership in all levels and programmes to strengthen their capacity,” said Rengam, who is also a 2017 Gender Pioneers awardee.

Despite the positive outcomes, PANAP Senior Science Advisor Dr. Meriel Watts, is however disappointed that civil society organisations (CSOs) such as PAN, were excluded from important discussions on the effectiveness of the Rotterdam Convention.

“As CSOs, we have much to contribute and we hope that CSOs will be included in future discussions on this issue,” she said.

There was also disappointment when no consensus was reached on the listing of carbosulfan and pesticide formulations paraquat dichloride and fenthion in Annex 3 of Rotterdam Convention even though the Parties agreed they met the criteria for the listing.

“Rotterdam facilitates information sharing and so we urge those countries who blocked the inclusion of carbosulfan, and the two pesticide formulations, paraquat and fenthion, in the list to go to fields and plantations and see the real impact of these chemicals on the health of workers, farmers and their communities and the environment and not just look at its narrow economic benefits,” said Rengam.

PAN further calls upon all Parties to the Conventions to act on the State of Palestine’s request for assistance with the removal of and the monitoring and prevention of illegal traffic of banned pesticides and chemical wastes in the Israeli-occupied West Bank Region.

Dr.Watts reiterated, “A programme for monitoring and clean-up in this region is desperately needed.”

In parting, Dr.Watts said, “We welcome the COPs recognition of the need to link human rights and sound management of chemicals and waste, and thus, we strongly suggest specific discussion on this is included in the next BRS agenda.”
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Contacts:
Sarojeni Rengam – sarojeni.rengam@panap.net
Dr.Meriel Watts – meriel@merielwatts.net

 

Palestinian children are not spared from the illegal dumping of pesticides

 

Last month a joint APN-PANAP report revealed some gruesome facts of Palestinian children suffering a myriad of health impacts. A young school child has become a victim of blood cancer. Many are asthmatic or have respiratory problems. Generally, these are the common observations among children in towns near the Israeli-operated Geshuri agrochemical manufacturing plant.

Children are especially vulnerable to toxic pesticides because they breathe more air, eat more food and drink more water per unit of body weight which leads to greater exposure in a toxin-contaminated environment.

Fatima Al-Zahra’ School’s situation is not different from that of the other schools within 500 metres of the industrial complex. Daily school routines are hindered since the chemical fumes have intensified since February 2016. The noxious gases have made it impossible for the students to carry out physical education classes or morning exercises and oftentimes, students are quarantined during school hours.

The continued operation of the agrochemical plants is in violation of humans’ right to health, safe environment and life. It tramples children’s rights.

Articles 6 and 24 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child state that “every child has the inherent right to life,” that the survival and development of the child must be ensured to the “maximum extent possible,” and that “the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health” must be safeguarded and upheld.

The UN Special Rapporteur on the right to food, Hilal Elver, and the Special Rapporteur on hazardous substances and wastes, Baskut Tuncak, have stated in their report, “While scientific research confirms the adverse effects of pesticides, proving a definitive link between exposure and human diseases or conditions, or harm to the ecosystem presents a considerable challenge.

“This challenge has been exacerbated by a systematic denial, fuelled by the pesticide and agroindustry, of the magnitude of the damage inflicted by these chemicals, and aggressive, unethical marketing tactics remain unchallenged.”

The rapporteurs have also called for buffer zones to be put in place to safeguard children from the effects of pesticide exposure while waiting for pesticides to be phased out.

We strongly call for the dismantling the Geshuri pesticide factory, and the other factories in the industrial settlements, under the guidance of a team of international and Palestinian experts, in order to prevent further health and environmental damage, and to remediate the land and return it to Palestinians

#StopPoisoningPalestine #PesticidesFreeWorld

TAKE ACTION >> Join us in taking a stand for children’s health

SHOW YOUR SOLIDARITY >> Stop Poisoning Palestine

DOWNLOAD & READ >> Human Rights and Toxic Chemicals in the Occupied West Bank (Palestine)

Israel’s Toxic Pesticides Poison Palestine, Reports Find

Press Release

Israel’s Illegal Production, Trade and Dumping of Toxic Pesticides Violate Human Rights, Threaten Food Sovereignty in Occupied West Bank

Confiscated banned pesticides illegally traded into Occupied Palestinian Territories from Israel. Dukatalon (paraquat and diquat) from Syngenta (L) and Israeli-manufactured endosulfan Thionex (R). Photo credit: Tanya Lee

February 20 (Amman, Jordan) ¬– The illegal trade and the manufacture and use of toxic pesticides in Israeli illegal settlements, result in serious human rights violations and contribute to the food insecurity in the Occupied West Bank. This was the conclusion of a joint fact-finding mission led by the Arab Group for the Protection of Nature (APN) and the PAN Asia Pacific (PANAP).

The investigation reveals the presence of highly hazardous pesticides banned by the Palestinian Authority (PA), such as endosulfan and Dukatalon (paraquat), but illegally traded into the Occupied Palestinian Territories. The reports found that 50% of pesticides in Palestine are illegal, and that five tonnes of banned pesticides have been confiscated since 1995.
Palestine is in no position to dispose of these safely, and Israel refuses to take them back. “It is unacceptable that the PA, with one of the tightest pesticide registration and compliance systems, including not allowing pesticides that are banned in their country of origin, is thwarted at every turn by the Israeli authorities who knowingly facilitate the entry of banned highly hazardous pesticides into the Occupied West Bank,” says Dr. Meriel Watts of PANAP, who participated in the mission.

Pesticide run-off from agricultural operations and hazardous wastes from the manufacture of agrochemicals inside the illegal settlements poison Palestinian farms, livestock, and water sources. Dumping hazardous wastes in Palestinian territory has been documented, including in areas with a high concentration of schools. Communities near Israel’s industrial settlements in the West Bank have reported contamination of their soil and drinking water, proliferation of disease-carrying mosquitoes, and increased incidence of respiratory and eye diseases, including among children. “Some of these agrochemical companies have been shut down inside the Green Line for violations of environmental and health regulations, but operate with impunity inside illegal settlements at the expense of the health, livelihood and environment of Palestinians,” said Razan Zuayter, founder and Board Member of APN. Moreover, the PA does not have access to information on the chemicals manufactured and used inside the illegal settlements.

These activities have been found to violate Palestinians’ rights to information, self-determination, water, highest attainable standard of health and healthy environment, and livelihood. The Israeli State and agrochemical corporations have been identified as accountable for their failure to prevent the illegal trade, and for not providing access to just and fair redress and effective remedy, the reports argue. Razan adds, “these human rights violations are perpetrated in the context of the Israeli occupation and expansion of the illegal settlements”. She cites Israeli control prevents PA from fully enforcing policies to restrict the trade, manufacture and use of around 200 registered active ingredients in Occupied West Bank, as well as to respond to the crisis.

The two reports will be launched along with an international online petition outlining recommendations for the international community. “What more perfect timing to launch the reports but on World Social Justice Day, with the urgent need to bridge the accountability gap and hold the Israeli State and agrochemical companies legally liable for their injustice to the Palestinian people,” concludes Sarojeni Rengam, Executive Director of PANAP.

#StopPoisoningPalestine #WorldSocialJusticeDay #PesticidesFreeWorld

To download the reports: Pesticides and Agroecology in the Occupied West Bank
Human Rights and Toxic Chemicals in the Occupied West Bank (Palestine)
To access the online petition: Stop Poisoning Palestine

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For more information, please contact:

Ms Razan Zuayter, Board Member, Arab Group for the Protection of Nature (APN), Amman, Jordan
Tel: +962 (6) 567 3331; info@apnature.org, cc mariamjaajaa@gmail.com, advocacy@apnature.org

Ms Sarojeni V. Rengam, Executive Director, PAN Asia Pacific (PANAP), Penang Malaysia. Tel: +604 657 0271/ +604 656 0381; sarojeni.rengam@panap.net, cc ava.danlog@panap.net

Dr Meriel Watts, PAN Asia Pacific, merielwatts@xtra.co.nz, + 61-21-1807830

Defend food sovereignty! Strengthen community resilience amid climate crisis!

From 1-16 October, 34 organisations of farmers, rural women and advocacy groups from 17 countries across the globe have responded to the most urgent crises faced by small-scale farmers and food producers, especially in poor countries- climate change, hunger, food insecurity, and land grabbing through PAN Asia Pacific’s “16 Days of Global Action on Land and Resources”.

Monsanto A Culprit In Global Food And Climate Crises: Support For The International Monsanto Tribunal!

tribunal-monsanto

We, individuals and representatives of various people’s and civil society organisations fully support the International Monsanto Tribunal, which will be held in The Hague, Netherlands from 14 to 16 October 2016.

Following procedures of the International Court of Justice, the Tribunal will hold Monsanto accountable for human rights and environmental violations. We believe that such an initiative, supported through international solidarity, will be a crucial step towards corporate accountability and achieving justice for Monsanto’s victims worldwide. It is apparent that Monsanto’s vast monopoly control over seeds and chemical inputs has put millions of food producers and rural peoples under a web of suffering and exploitation. Their most basic rights to health and life—as well as economic, social, and cultural rights—are needlessly violated. This was no less than the indictment of a Permanent People’s Tribunal on Agrochemical TNCs, held in 2011 at Bangalore, India, wherein Monsanto was one of the six agrochemical TNCs found guilty of “gross, widespread and systematic violations,” based on testimonies by victims and health and environmental scientists.

Since the beginning of the twentieth century, Monsanto, a US-based transnational corporation (TNC), has developed and marketed highly toxic pesticides that were proven to have permanently damaged the environment and killed or caused the illnesses of thousands of people including children.

The most hazardous of these products include the Persistent Organic Pollutant PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyls); the Vietnam War defoliant Agent Orange; and Round-Up, a glyphosate herbicide used widely in combination with genetically modified (GM) seeds. Monsanto’s Round-Up is a probable carcinogen classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and yet the use of Round-Up has increased tremendously due to the aggressive public relations and marketing efforts by Monsanto.  Victims of acute and chronic poisoning from these and other toxic chemicals have not been acknowledged or compensated by Monsanto. Their numbers also continue to grow on a daily basis.

Together with the world’s largest agrochemical TNCs, Monsanto has for the past decades aggressively shaped and promoted an agro-industrial model that is estimated to contribute around one-third of greenhouse gas emissions, further aggravating the climate crisis. This input-intensive model has depleted soil and water resources, degraded the environment, and destroyed biodiversity on a global scale.

Increasingly, Monsanto creates large-scale monocultures of GM crops dedicated to animal feed and biofuels, further endangering food security, displacing small food producers, and contributing to the rapid loss of traditional seeds and varieties. Food sovereignty, especially of rural women who have been seed savers and keepers for generations, is greatly undermined.

Monsanto has profited immensely from patenting life forms and placing additional economic burdens on farmers. In India, for instance, 95 percent of cotton is grown using Monsanto’s technology; in these same cotton fields, thousands of farmers end their own life because Monsanto’s BT cotton did not perform as promised, leaving the farmers in debt. Elsewhere, farmers also have to pay increasing royalties and fines demanded by Monsanto, who have enlisted governments in monitoring—and profiteering from—the use of their technology.

As the global food and climate crises worsens, as do poverty and hunger among the world’s food producers and rural peoples, it becomes even more pressing that, as an international community, we call out one of the biggest corporation and make them accountable to these violations. We believe that without a stronger and more united push for corporate accountability, Monsanto will continue to get away with these violations at the expense of future generations.

Support the International Monsanto Tribunal!  Sign the petition:

If you are signing on as an organization – http://www.monsanto-tribunal.org/sign-org

If you are signing on as an individual – http://www.monsanto-tribunal.org/sign

 

Defend Food Sovereignty! Fight for Climate Justice!

Resist Corporate Takeover on Agriculture!

Push for Corporate Accountability!

 

 

Signatories:

 

Regional/International NGOs

PAN Asia Pacific (PANAP)

People’s Coalition on Food Sovereignty (PCFS)

Asian Peasant Coalition (APC)

 

CAMBODIA

Cambodian Center for Study and Development in Agriculture (CEDAC)

 

CHINA

Eco-Women

 

INDONESIA

Serikat Perempuan Indonesia (SERUNI)

GITA PERTIWI Ecological Studies Programme

 

MALAYSIA

North South Initiative (NSI)

 

PHILIPPINES

Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas/Peasant Movement of the Philippines (KMP)

National Federation of Peasant Women (AMIHAN)

Sining na Naglilingkod sa Bayan (SINAGBAYAN)

National Network of Agrarian Reform Advocates – Youth (NNARA-YOUTH)

 

THAILAND

Sustainable Development Foundation (SDF)

Alternative Agriculture Network (AAN)

 

VIETNAM

Research Centre for Gender, Family and Environment in Development (CGFED)

Centre for Sustainable Rural Development (SRD)

 

FIJI

femLINKPacific Media Initiatives for Women (femLINKPACIFIC)

 

BANGLADESH
Bangladesh Resource Centre for Indigenous Knowledge (BARCIK)

 

INDIA

SAHANIVASA

NISARGA

THANAL

KUDUMBAM

Society for Rural Education and Development (SRED)

Tamil Nadu Women’s Forum (TNWF)

 

SRI LANKA

Vikalpani National Women’s Federation

Savisthri (Women in Development Alternatives) Movement

 

PAKISTAN

KHOJ Society for People’s Education

Pakistan Kissan Mazdoor Tehreek (PKMT)

ROOTS for Equity

 

KYRGYZTAN

Alga

 

MONGOLIA

Centre for Human Rights and Development (CHRD)

Peoples’ Coalition for Food Sovereignty – Mongolia Chapter

 

SENEGAL

PAN Africa

 

ETHIOPIA

Pesticide Action Nexus Association, PAN-Ethiopia

 

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The 16 Days of Global Action on Land and Resources, supports the Monsanto Tribunal on 14-16 October in The Hague, Netherlands. The 16 Days of Global Action on Land and Resources is a series of collective action of 31 organisations of farmers, women and other advocacy groups from 19 countries. It will culminate on 15 and 16 October.

Tackling the Accountability Gap of TNCs

This video presents a practical guide on the legal tools available to hold pesticide companies accountable for health and environmental damages caused by the indiscriminate use of their products.
Key areas of judicial and non-judicial intervention are:

  • Public law: legal action against governments
  • Private law: legal action against companies
  • International mechanisms: strategies for the UNFAO, Stockholm Convention, and Rotterdam Convention